Recipes from Nicolas Ghirlando : Fish fingers to Friday nights.

Tahini-meenie-miny-mo


It’s normally always there, lingering in the back of the cupboard, the lid slightly encrusted with a beige residue and the oil separated from the paste, sitting on top in a questionable pool. Then there is a fight to get the near solidified clay out of the bottom and not bend the spoon. And that’s all before you discover you haven’t got a tin of chickpeas anyway so have to go to the shop. Again.

But fear not! This homemade tahini will save the day. And if there’s ever a houmous crisis in the shops again, you can whip up your own in a jiffy. And then you can put it in a jar in the fridge and the whole family dip a carrot stick in it for lunch on Saturday then forget about it until you throw it away a week later as you wonder why you bother.

Of course, this all depends on you having a bag of sesame seeds in the cupboard. I’d suggest that it is a staple worth having, and really, it’s nicer making your own tahini anyway. It just (as with most things that are freshly made) tastes so much better. And you know it only has what you put in it in it.

Method
To make a jam jar sized amount of fresh tahini, sprinkle sesame seeds all over an oven tray, you can be very generous. Heat the oven to 180c and roast the seeds until they start to colour a little and toast. Stir them round occasionally so they don’t burn.

Leave to cool a little then put in the food processor and blitz until you have a crumbly mix. Slowly add in some neutral oil, such as groundnut or rapeseed and keep blending until you have a creamy paste. Transfer to a jar and keep in the fridge.

Apart from houmous — which I would recommend making using dried chickpeas for a better finished dish, but, if you only have tinned I’m not going to judge you —  tahini can be used in dressings, sauces with some yoghurt, drizzled over roast carrots or even put into ice cream. And what’s more, there’s a little more cupboard space and the satisfaction of the homemade.

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